Ask Your Preacher

Ask Your Preacher

SALVATION

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An Old Argument

Friday, September 26, 2014
     If baptism is required, then the criminals on the cross next to Jesus are not in heaven?

Sincerely,
What About Those Guys?

Dear What About Those Guys,

There are four explanations for Christ’s pardon of the crucified thief in Lk 23:39-43 (He only pardoned one of them; the other one continued to hurl abuse at Jesus – Lk. 23:39).  All of them fit in perfect harmony with the necessity of baptism and the New Testament teachings that salvation begins at baptism (1 Pet 3:21, Acts 2:37-38, Mk 16:16, Rom 6:3-4).

  1. 1. This thief may very well have been baptized by John the Baptist (Mk 1:4) or one of Jesus’ disciples (Jhn 4:1-2).  We simply don’t know enough about this thief to say whether he was or wasn’t baptized.  It is always faulty to build a doctrine off an assumption.  To say that we don’t need to be baptized because that thief wasn’t baptized is an assumption.
  2. The thief was physically unable to be baptized.  2 Cor 8:12 tells us that God only holds us accountable for what we are physically able to do.  That thief didn’t have the capability to get off that cross and be baptized.  The argument could be made that he was excused from the law of baptism the same way that a mute man would be excused from the command to “confess Christ with your tongue” (Rom 14:11).  This isn’t the best argument of the four, but it is a valid point worth considering.
  3. While Jesus was here on earth, He had the authority to forgive sins as He saw fit (Matt 9:6).  This thief was no different than any of the other people whose sins were verbally forgiven by Christ as He walked this earth (Lk 7:48-49, Lk 5:20).  Since Jesus is no longer on this earth… baptism is the only other way to have your sins removed.
  4. The command to be baptized for salvation is a New Testament command.  Those who are baptized become a part of the church (Acts 2:41).  If we are being technical (and there is a time for technicalities), the church and the New Testament law didn’t come into effect until after Jesus died and rose from the grave.  Until Jesus’ death and resurrection, the laws of the Old Testament would have still been in effect.  That thief wasn’t bound to the law of baptism (a New Testament law) because Jesus hadn’t yet died.

No matter which argument seems the sturdiest to you (they all have merit), the thief on the cross example doesn’t negate the necessity of baptism today.

Fear Of The Unknown

Thursday, September 11, 2014
    I have a lot of questions that I would like to ask, but I am going to only ask one – even if it is a crazy one.  I am scared to die, but I want to go to a good place.  How do I get rid of the scared feeling of dying?

Sincerely,
Coffin Coward

Dear Coffin Coward,

The Bible tells us that if Jesus is on our side, we can approach the throne of God with confidence (Heb 4:14-16).  We fear the unknown, and fear of death diminishes when we know where we are going after we die.  All humans have a natural survival instinct, so it is completely normal to have a natural fear of death, but God also tells us that christians can have hope that death is just the beginning of an eternal life in heaven (Jhn 6:40).

So how do we get eternal life?  The Bible says that Jesus is the way to eternal life (Jhn 3:16).  If you are in Christ, you are saved (1 Cor 15:22).  So how do we get into Christ?  Gal 3:27 says that when we are baptized, we put on Christ.  Baptism is the final of five steps to become a christian (read “Five Steps To Salvation” for the full plan of salvation).  When you are in Christ, you have hope and don’t near to fear the Judgment Day.

That Sinking Feeling

Sunday, August 17, 2014
Do you have to be baptized to go to heaven?

Sincerely,
Immersed In Questions

Dear Immersed In Questions,

The most well-documented and clearest doctrine in the New Testament is baptism… yet, it is also the most commonly ignored topic in the religious world.  It is impossible to be saved without being baptized.  Peter said it best when he said, “Baptism saves you” (1 Pet 3:21).  Every person that became a christian in the New Testament was baptized – immediately.  You won’t find a single person in the book of Acts that wasn’t baptized.  When the first sermon was preached after Christ ascended into heaven, the apostles told the people that they needed to “repent and be baptized… for the remission of their sins” (Acts 2:38).  Paul tells us that baptism is a burial with Christ, and only after that burial do we receive a new life (Rom 6:3-4).  Baptism was so important to Paul that he was baptized even before eating or drinking (Acts 9:18-19), which shows how important it is because Paul hadn’t had food or water in three days (Acts 9:9)!  Belief is not enough; even the demons believe in God (Jas 2:19).  It is only when our belief is combined with obedience that we have living faith (Jas 2:17-18), and the very first command to obey that God gives us is to be baptized in the name of His Son (Matt 28:19, Mk 16:16).

Self-Motivator

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
     I am a bit new to Christianity.  I feel really out of place in church and appreciate all the answers so far.  I have read the Bible but don't fully understand it; I'm workin’ on it.  I had an experience with God where He showed me that He was real, and I started reading directly after that.  This question revolves around will.  After my first experiences with God, I felt a dramatic change in my life.  I felt the presence of the Holy Spirit, and I wanted to follow the rules to a tee.  I wanted to do God's will and have His will done through me.  I would've done just about anything, and I could strongly sense God controlling and leading my life.  He was presenting opportunities and challenges and speaking to me on a very normal basis.  This feeling slowly dwindled, and I don't know how to get it back.  Furthermore, to be quite honest, I don't really WANT to get it back.  At the present, I don't want to get close to God by doing His will, studying, or even praying sometimes.  I would rather do my own will.  I know it's wrong.  I know our relationship with God is the only thing on this world that really matters, but for some reason, I just don't really feel like doing it.

But I would like to feel like doing it because I know I should.  That was the single greatest feeling I've ever experienced, but for some reason (I don't really know why), I just don't seem to want it anymore.

Any suggestions?

Sincerely,
Not In The Mood

Dear Not In The Mood,

Our closeness to God isn’t defined by how close we feel to Him or by any personal revelation we think we receive… the Scriptures are our compass, not our emotions.  When the Bible was perfectly completed, all prophecy and individual revelations were done away with (1 Cor 13:9-10).  Paul told Timothy that he was approved by God when he rightly handled the Word of Truth (2 Tim 2:15).  Col 1:5 says that we have hope through the Word of God, and Eph 1:13 says we are sealed with the promise of the Holy Spirit through the Gospel of salvation.

Many people wholeheartedly believe that they are pleasing to God but will be condemned on the Day of Judgment (Matt 7:22-23).  Feelings can be deceptive, but God’s Word is unchanging, unbiased, and able to rightly divide our lives and character (Heb 4:12).  If you want to know whether or not you are pleasing God, compare your life to the Scriptures.  “Faith comes by hearing and hearing by the Word of God (Rom 10:17).”

It is very common for people to have an initial burst of enthusiasm when they first learn about Christ.  Matt 13:20-21 tells about the person that has an unrooted love of God – that is true for lots of folks.  The key for you is that you need to be different.  You need to put out the effort even when you don’t feel like it.  We are defined by what we do when it is hard, not when it is easy.

Part of your problem may be that you aren’t amongst a group of people that are feeding you the Word of God.  Many churches teach emotionalism but not Scripture, and that leaves you feeling defeated the first time things get difficult.  If you would like help finding a congregation near you that faithfully stands by God’s Word, feel free to e-mail us at askyourpreacher@mvchurchofchrist.org, and we will help you locate one.

Open-Book Test

Tuesday, July 22, 2014
     I want to know: how do you test your faith?

Sincerely,
Feeling Testy

Dear Feeling Testy,

2 Cor 13:5 says that we should test to see whether we are in the faith.  Paul is referring to the fact that we should examine ourselves to see whether we are living faithfully.  Paul also taught this concept in 1 Cor 11:28-31.  We test ourselves by comparing our lives to the Bible.  Within the Bible are the words that create a faithful life (Rom 10:17, Rom 1:16-17).

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