Ask Your Preacher

Ask Your Preacher

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The Perfect Word

Wednesday, December 05, 2018
     Would you please elaborate on 1 Corinthians 13:8–10?  How do we know that the word ‘perfect’ is referring to the Bible?

Sincerely,
Definition Please

Dear Definition Please,

The perfect that is described in 1 Cor 13:8-13 is typically thought to be one of two things.  It is either perfect knowledge of God’s Will (also known as the completed Bible) or the Second Coming of Christ.  So, let’s look at the details we are given about ‘the perfect’ and see which one fits better.

  1. ‘The perfect’ is something that would replace partial knowledge (1 Cor 13:9).
  2. ‘The perfect’ would remove the necessity for prophecy and new knowledge (1 Cor 13:8).
  3. When ‘the perfect’ comes, christians will still be expected to have faith, hope, and love (1 Cor 13:13).

The third item on that list is proof that ‘the perfect’ isn’t the Second Coming of Christ.  When Christ returns, we will no longer need hope or faith.  Faith is trusting in something you can’t see (Heb 11:1); when Jesus comes, we won’t need to have faith in Him – everyone will see Him, and every knee will bow (Rom 14:11).  Hope is also something that ceases to exist when Jesus returns.  Hope is always in something you haven’t attained yet (Rom 8:25).  For example, if a child is told by his parents that they will take him to Disneyland, the child has faith in the parents’ promise and hopes to see Disneyland… until the day that he walks into the Magic Kingdom.  Hope and faith only exist because Christ hasn’t returned yet.

‘The perfect’ has to be something that happened after prophecy and miracles ended, but before Jesus’ return.  The most logical explanation is that Paul was discussing the perfect and complete knowledge that can be found in the completed Bible.  Today, with a finished Bible, the church still needs faith, hope, and love, but we no longer have a need for prophecy, and we no longer have only partial knowledge of God’s Will (Jude 1:3).

Without Creedence Pt. 2

Monday, December 03, 2018

(This is a follow-up to the post “Without Creedence”)

Your answer to the difference between creeds and publications that preachers write didn't fully explain a difference between the two.  Can you please show me where different denominations hold their "creed" books to the same standard as the Bible?  I have had many discussions with various Lutherans and Baptists alike, and none of them view their supplements to the same degree of Bible authority.  They all view them as teaching tools to supplement the Word.  Many preachers claim that their writings should be heard because they are "based" on the Word of God.  Many religious groups with creed books would claim the same.  I believe the difference between a creed book and the publications church of Christ preachers write is that we believe that one follows the Bible, and the others don't.  Our friends outside the church make the same claim.  Anytime we hold our opinions and explanations to demand the same level of attention as plain Scripture, we have written creeds by your definition.  Maybe we should simply point people to Scripture and quit offering our opinions.

Sincerely,
Tracking Tracts

Dear Tracking Tracts,

If a preacher takes something he writes and gives it equal weight to the Bible, then he is sinning, but we’ve never personally experienced someone using a tract or commentary that way.  Your statement that “many preachers claim…” is arbitrary, and we can’t speak to personal experiences and subjective viewpoints.  In fact, the discussions you have had with various Lutherans and Baptists are also subjective because most Baptists and Lutherans don’t know what their own creed books even say.  The key is to read the books for yourself and ask what the leaders of these churches say about their creeds.  The Lutheran church uses four creeds: The Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed, the Athanasian Creed, and the Augsburg Confessional.  They teach that these creeds are authoritative guides for their worship and beliefs – they aren’t commentaries; they are distinct belief systems that don’t require Bible authority to back them.  As we said, read them yourselves.

The Baptists are even more blatant about the value they place upon their creeds.  The Standard Manual For Baptist Churches says that baptism used to be a necessary part of salvation, but now things are different (Standard Manual for Baptist Churches pg. 22).  That type of a statement clearly places their manual as a religious authority above the Bible!

Not all people who are part of a religious group understand why they do what they do and where their beliefs come from, but that doesn’t make the creed any less of a guide for their respective denominations.  These creeds add to God’s Word, and that is definitely wrong (Rev 22:18-19, 1 Cor 4:6).

Pre-Saved?

Friday, November 30, 2018
Are we predestinated to be saved according to Acts 13:48 and Ephesians 1:4-5 amongst others?  Is Calvinism true about predestination?

Sincerely,
Chosen By God

Dear Chosen By God,

We here at AYP firmly believe in election, grace, and predestination because they are all terms clearly mentioned in the Bible.  The important questions to ask are:

  1. How are we elected?
  2. Who receives grace?
  3. What is predestined?

Many false doctrines have been created because people failed to ask these questions.  Calvinism (a very popular false doctrine that has infected many churches) teaches that people are elected by God without any conditions and that it is impossible to choose to serve God; it is all up to God.  It also teaches that grace can never be lost and that it is impossible to fall away even if you become an axe-murderer or live a homosexual lifestyle.  Calvinism also teaches that God predestined specific people throughout history to be saved and that only those specific individuals will go to heaven – everyone else is lost by default.  (For further information on Calvinism, please read “Calvin And Sobs”.)  This is an example of how the words ‘election’, ‘grace’, and ‘predestination’ have been abused when we didn’t clarify their biblical meanings.

God teaches that He has elected certain people to be saved.  John 6:44-45 says that God draws people to Him through the Bible.  When we listen to what the Bible says, we are called by God.  2 Thess 2:14 makes it even clearer when it says that we are called through the Gospel. ‘Called’ is another word for ‘elected’.

Those who turn to Christ will receive grace.  ‘Grace’ means ‘unmerited or undeserved favor’; grace is a gift you haven’t earned… in this case, it is the gift of salvation.  We receive grace when we live by faith (Eph 2:8).  Jesus died and paid a price none of us could ever pay – the price of our sins.  When we walk according to His teachings, His blood cleanses us from sin (1 Jn 1:7).  A faithful life isn’t a perfect life, but it is a life that is guided by God’s Word (Rom 10:17).

The Bible also teaches that God predestined something to be saved.  ‘Predestined’ means ‘to set the limits’.  Before God made anything, He set the limits of who would be saved and who wouldn’t (Eph 1:5).  God said that those in Christ will be saved (2 Tim 1:9).  Everyone who is washed in the blood of Jesus will be saved – He is the only way to God (Jhn 14:6).  God predestined only a certain group of people to be saved – the church (Acts 20:28).  The question we must all ask ourselves is: am I a part of God’s church?

Repent

Thursday, November 29, 2018
Can you explain what repent means?

Sincerely,
Webster

Dear Webster,

‘Repent’ means to ‘change your mind’. A change of mind always involves a change of action as well. Repentance is when we change our mind about what is important and submit ourselves to Jesus and His Word. Repentance is one of the necessary steps to be saved (Mk 6:12, Lk 13:5, Lk 15:7).  Read "Five Steps To Salvation" for all the steps involved in becoming a christian.

Work It Out

Tuesday, November 27, 2018
     How many different types of works does the Bible mention?  I'm having a hard time figuring out when something is physical work, spiritual work, or some other type of work.

Sincerely,
Hard At Work

Dear Hard At Work,

As a general rule, there are two basic types of works talked about in the New Testament.  The works of the law are perfect works, i.e. a life without sinning.  These are the type of works that Paul discussed in Romans.  We cannot be saved by perfect works because all of us have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God (Rom 3:23, Rom 3:28).

The other basic type of work found in the New Testament is the work of faith.  Works of faith are when we serve God based upon our trust in Him and desire to become more like Him.  Works of faith are a requirement for salvation – it is impossible to have faith without some sort of action that shows your trust (Jas 2:17-20).  Faithful works aren't perfect, but they show obedience and loyalty.

In the New Testament especially, almost all circumstances can be broken down into those two categories.  However, as always, context is final judge.

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